Therese Sellers

Harvard classicist Therese Sellers made her debut as a published author in 2013 with Alpha is for Anthropos, a lavishly illustrated collection of original nursery rhymes in Ancient Greek that she composed to teach Greek to children.

Therese moved to Athens in 1987 to pursue biographical research on the American philhellene and theatre director, Eva Palmer Sikelianos. In 1988 she bought a piece of property in the Peloponnese near the ancient theatre of Epidaurus and built a house there that has provided her with a life-long connection to Greece.

In 2011, Therese left her job as a middle-school Latin teacher to have more time to write. She had been blogging seriously for a year whilst continually adding to the collection of Ancient Greek verses she had been composing for seventeen years. 

Long before publishing Alpha is for Anthropos, Therese created various homemade versions of the book for her young students by printing out her Greek nursery rhymes and binding them in orange report covers with brads. Eventually, they had one page and one verse for each letter in the Greek alphabet. After working closely with her sister, the artist, classicist and illustrator Lucy Bell Jarka-Sellers, Alpha is for Anthropos was finally completed.

Therese is currently completing a translation of Aioliki Yi by Greek author Ilias Venezis, a lyrical account of the author’s childhood in Asia Minor before World War I. Then she plans to return to the manuscript of her novel, Asa and Irini, a coming-of-age story set in New York in the nineteen eighties.

You can follow Therese on various social networking sites including:

http://theresesellers.org/

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ALPHA IS FOR ANTHROPOS

A unique introduction to Ancient Greek and Greek vase painting for all ages. The text consists of twenty-four original nursery rhymes in Ancient Greek to be sung to familiar tunes. Each poem or song aims to teach a basic Greek vocabulary word while placing it in a broader cultural and linguistic context. The illustrations amplify the meanings of the words and songs with evocative allusions to Greek mythology and the world of Greek vase painting. This book is a treasure trove for anyone, child or adult, who wants an exuberant yet erudite introduction to the riches of Ancient Greek language, art and thought.

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